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Why are Eye Exams Important?

During a complete eye exam, your eye doctor will not only determine your prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses, but will also check your eyes for common eye diseases, assess how your eyes work together as a team and evaluate your eyes as an indicator of your overall health.

Who should get their eyes examined?

What is the eye doctor checking for?

In addition to evaluating whether you have nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism, your eye doctor will check your eyes for eye diseases and other problems that could lead to vision loss. Here are some examples of the conditions that your eye doctor will be looking for:

  • Amblyopia: This occurs when the eyes are misaligned or when one eye has a much different prescription than the other. The brain will “shut off” the image from the turned or blurry eye. If left untreated, amblyopia can stunt the visual development of the affected eye, resulting in permanent vision impairment. Amblyopia is often treated by patching the stronger eye for periods of time.
  • Strabismus: Strabismus is defined as crossed or turned eyes. Your eye doctor will check your eyes’ alignment to be sure that they are working together. Strabismus causes problems with depth perception and can lead to amblyopia.
  • Eye Diseases: Many eye diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetic eye disease, have no obvious symptoms in their early stages. Your eye doctor will check the health of your eyes inside and out for signs of early problems. In most cases, early detection and treatment of eye diseases can help reduce your risk for permanent vision loss.
  • Other Diseases: Your eye doctor can detect early signs of some systemic conditions and diseases by looking at your eye’s blood vessels, retina and so forth. They may be able to tell you if you are developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol or other problems.

    For example, diabetes can cause small blood vessel leaks or bleeding in the eye, as well as swelling of the macula (the most sensitive part of the retina), which can lead to vision loss. It’s estimated that one-third of Americans who have diabetes don’t know it; your eye doctor may detect the disease before your primary care physician does, especially if you’re overdue for a physical.

What’s the difference between a vision screening and a complete eye exam?

Vision screenings are general eye tests that are meant to help identify people who are at risk for vision problems. Screenings include brief vision tests performed by a school nurse, pediatrician or volunteers. The eye test you take when you get your driver’s license renewed is another example of a vision screening.

A vision screening can indicate that you need to get an eye exam, but it does not serve as a substitute for a comprehensive eye exam.

No matter who you are, regular eye exams are important for seeing more clearly, learning more easily and preserving your vision for life.

 

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Our office will be opening on Monday, May 18th. We will be following all CDC guidelines as well as those recommended by our National and State Organizations including the KOA and AOA as well as the Governor of Kentucky. We will be adding to our protocol to ensure the safety of our patients and staff. Due to the recommendations, we are following, all patients will need to call from the parking lot when they arrive. We will ask you if you are running a fever, or have symptoms of COVID-19. We may even take your temperature to keep for our records. We will ask that you remain in your car until we notify you to come to our office.

All patients entering the building must wear a mask or face covering.

We ask for your patience over the next few months as we work to get our patients rescheduled that had to be canceled during the closure. We will not be working at full capacity for some time and realize this will most likely cause delays in getting people rescheduled. We will also not be taking walk-in patients and ask that you please call if you need to be seen to set up an appointment. Please know that we are doing everything we can to take care of our patients during these difficult times.

You now can order contacts from the convenience of your home on our website by clicking here.
If you do not know your current prescription, please email us at dr.glenn0180@gmail.com or call us at 859-271-6194.
If you have insurance you would like to use, you will need to call us and we will be happy to place the order for you and submit it to your insurance.

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you all soon,

Dr. Jason Glenn and Staff